What We do Matters

I am currently working on a post that traces the history of funding public education in Iowa. I am curious just how the funding formula has changed since the 1950s. This is taking a lot of research and as a “break” (HA!), I thought I would respond to a post my friend and colleague, Pat Kearney, wrote last week entitled A Community of Educators. Pat wrote an outstanding post about his thinking around the challenges facing educators today. I can’t encourage you enough to go and check out his writing. Let me share a few great nuggets: Continue reading “What We do Matters”

Best Practices for Using Rubrics

Spurred by part of a PLC discussion, I have been reading through our district’s document, Best Practices for Using Rubrics to Determine Grades. We currently formatively and summatively assess student performance using our Wind and Percussion Rubrics. Each criterion (tone quality, technique, etc.) has four different levels of performance (currently: exceeds standard, meets standard, making progress, not making progress). Our PLC discussion sprung from the completion of our 6-Week Assessment, transitioning into our 12-Week Assessment, and some professional development occurring at one of our middle schools. Continue reading “Best Practices for Using Rubrics”

Solo and Ensemble

This weekend, students at my school performed at the Perry Band Olympics, a solo and ensemble festival in Central Iowa. We have a write-up of how they did over on the Ankeny Bands website. During this six-week grading period, our vertical team of teachers selects a solo for each student from a database of graded literature (below grade level, at grade level, above grade level) we developed over the course of several years. We help the students prepare this solo for a summatively assessed performance around the time of the Perry Band Olympics. All students prepare for this assessment, regardless of their attendance at the festival. Continue reading “Solo and Ensemble”

2014 in Review

I know that I am 3-4 days late, but the stomach flu will do that to you. 2014 was a big year for me. I began blogging about my teaching experiences in October of 2013. The spring of 2014 is where that began to pick up as our professional learning community looked into curriculum and assessment and I began my Masters of Music Education program at VanderCook College of Music. Here is a review of all I posted over this past year: Continue reading “2014 in Review”

Reflecting on the 2014 Midwest Clinic

This past week, our school district sent 9 of the 14 instrumental music teachers to the Midwest Clinic in Chicago. Much or our trip was paid for by a Teacher Quality grant for which each of us applied. We were there Wednesday through Saturday and attended several outstanding clinics, heard some amazing performances, bought quite a bit of literature, and ate a lot of great food! As part of the Teacher Quality grant, we are asked to reflect on the clinics we attended and what we learned while at the conference. Below is a rough sketch of the different things I learned while at Midwest this year.

Continue reading “Reflecting on the 2014 Midwest Clinic”

Reflecting on the 2014 Midwest Clinic

This past week, our school district sent 9 of the 14 instrumental music teachers to the Midwest Clinic in Chicago. Much or our trip was paid for by a Teacher Quality grant for which each of us applied. We were there Wednesday through Saturday and attended several outstanding clinics, heard some amazing performances, bought quite a bit of literature, and ate a lot of great food! As part of the Teacher Quality grant, we are asked to reflect on the clinics we attended and what we learned while at the conference. Below is a rough sketch of the different things I learned while at Midwest this year.
Continue reading “Reflecting on the 2014 Midwest Clinic”

Reflecting on Teacher Evaluation

Over the past five weeks in my VanderCook class, Teaching Music in a Common Core World, we have been working through the National Association for Music Educators (NAfME) Workbook, Building and Evaluating Effective Music Educators in the School Ensemble, as well as the new National Core Music Standards. The workbook and the process tie the NAfME expectations to the Charlotte Danielson Framework for Teaching. As a conclusion to this part of the course, we were asked to reflect on the process with the following prompt:

Complete a comprehensive reflection paper. Include a recap of the concepts and strategies learned from the assignments that you completed over the last four weeks. This will fulfill part of the VanderCook College of Music exit assessment requirement. Take your time and thoroughly reflect on what we have covered over the last four weeks. This document needs to be worthy of 10% of your overall grade for the Teacher Evaluation unit of your grade.

Continue reading “Reflecting on Teacher Evaluation”